• Sarah

5 Reasons to Pause When Considering COVID19 Vaccines for Children

You may have heard that the FDA recently authorized the use of Pfizer and Moderna COVID19 shots in young children ages 6 months to 4 years old. Many people would assume that this means the long-term safety of these shots is well-understood, but that assumption is far off from the actual situation.


Here is some information for parents to consider when deciding whether or not to vaccinate their children for COVID19.


  1. COVID19 illness is very low-risk for kids.

  2. COVID19 vaccines have known risks including heart inflammation and anaphylactic shock.

  3. Clinical trials for the shots are still ongoing, so long-term risks for children’s development, chronic diseases (such as cancer and autoimmune disease), and fertility are unknown.

  4. Most kids already have natural immunity, which has been shown to be more robust and long-lasting than vaccine-induced immunity.

  5. COVID19 shots do not prevent either contracting or transmitting the illness. So, vaccinating children does not protect others.

 

1. COVID19 illness is very low risk for kids.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, only 0.7% of child COVID cases result in hospitalization, and children have a 99.99% survival rate from COVID19.



 

2. COVID vaccines have known risks including heart inflammation and anaphylactic shock.

The CDC has acknowledged multiple risks of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, including anaphylaxis and heart inflammation. (This is true for young children’s shots as well as all other age groups.)



Young people who have been vaccinated for COVID-19 are having heart inflammation at up to 14 times the expected rate. Some have permanent heart damage. For children ages 6 months-17 years, the CDC’s Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) has over 45,000 reports of adverse reactions, including over 50 deaths.


 

3. Clinical trials for the shots are still ongoing, so long-term risks for children’s development, chronic diseases (such as cancer and autoimmune disease), and fertility are unknown.

The recent rollout of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and Moderna vaccine for young children should not be misconstrued to imply long-term safety.


Both of these vaccines use new mRNA technology that has never been approved for use in vaccines before. The clinical trial for the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children is ongoing until 2024, and the clinical trial for the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for children is ongoing through 2023. Given that the clinical trials are not yet completed, these vaccines are still considered to be experimental, and long-term tests have not been completed.


It is not possible to accelerate long-term testing. In the absence of long-term safety tests, there are many unknowns about the potential effects of COVID-19 vaccines. Diseases such as cancer, leukemia, and autoimmune diseases don't show up until years into the clinical trials.


Long-term effects on children are unknown. It was originally assumed that the vaccine components would stay near the injection site. However, there is now evidence that the vaccine actually circulates throughout the body and ends up concentrating in the adrenal glands, bone marrow, and ovaries. There is also now evidence that these vaccines can actually modify DNA and gene expression. The effects of this are unknown.


It is unknown whether these vaccines will have any negative effects on children’s development. Effects on fertility are of particular concern for young people, yet the clinical trials for pregnant women have also not yet been completed and long-term effects are unknown.


Robert Malone’s short 4 minute video is an important resource when considering whether or not to vaccinate children for COVID-19. Malone is the inventor of the mRNA technology used in the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.


 

4. Most kids already have natural immunity, which has been shown to be more robust and long-lasting than vaccine-induced immunity.


According to the CDC, 75% of children already have natural immunity from COVID-19. Over 150 studies have shown that natural immunity is robust and long-lasting. Natural immunity will continue to be effective even against COVID-19 variants, whereas the vaccines are losing effectiveness against the variants.




CDC data shows that people who already have natural immunity are more likely to experience a negative reaction to the vaccines.


 

5. COVID-19 shots do not prevent either contracting or transmitting the illness. So, vaccinating children does not protect others.

It has been acknowledged by the CDC for many months that COVID-19 vaccines do not prevent the spread of the illness.



 

I hope this information is helpful for parents who are trying to decide whether their children should be vaccinated against COVID19. Most children already have robust natural immunity to the illness and children have very low risk from the illness. The increased risk of heart inflammation and unknown long-term impacts on children’s health, development, and fertility need to be carefully considered.

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